Japanese Four Traditional Fashion Garments

Although they have mastered the art of adapting and incorporating western concepts, Japan remains to be one of those countries that have high regard to their own culture. This holds true to their traditional garments. Even if these outfits are no longer worn every day since the 19th century, they still wear them with great passion during cultural activities, holidays, festivals, and ceremonies. Each traditional garb has corresponding designs for each of the season. Let’s get to know four (4) of the most famous traditional garments of Japanese fashion styles.

Kimono Kimono, the most famous of the four is formal wear which comes in different varieties with corresponding symbolic meanings. It is worn for Japanese rituals, ceremonies, and celebrations. It consists of sashes, silk robes, and other needed accessories. Such composition already makes it complex. The silk robes involved make this garb expensive. That’s the actual act of purchasing and wearing it is a difficult task to take. Despite the hassle and issue on a budget, kimono wearing is still worth it. Kimonos are a fixture in the landscapes of major Japanese cities.

Hakama

Hakama, another Japanese garment, is usually worn over a kimono. It is tied around the waist and is extended to ankles. The hakama is wide in form and it varies from being open just like a skirt or from having legs like trousers. In the early times, it is considered to be men’s clothing only. Hakamas offer a wide range of style for men of different classes. This includes styles for academics, aristocrats, samurais, farmers, and workmen. All of the styles are meant for everyday wear. Just recently, women have joined their male counterparts in wearing hakama at attending formal occasions and also at performing martial arts.

Obi

The most common wide sash of Japanese traditional garments is called obi. The wearer should use it to wrap around. It is ornate in form to match the design of the kimono. Others regard it as an example of Japanese fashion complexity at its finest. Like all other parts of the kimono, the sash is usually expensive for it is made of silk. They come in wide varieties of lengths, widths, and designs. Also, obis shouldn’t be mixed with other kimonos carelessly. There are certain obis that are meant for specific people on special occasions, likes brides on their wedding day. There are other obis as well that are made for Geishas and their Maikos. Books and other references that are dedicated to this sash are readily available.

Yukata

Arguably, the more modest and more austere robe in Japanese traditional garments is yukata. Contrary to the kimono which is meant for formal wear, yukata is to be worn in informal gatherings like viewing parties for the fall of the popular cherry blossom. Other events include festivals and fireworks. It is understandable that people prefer this garment because of its convenience in carrying it. It is light for it’s made of cotton.

Men stick to simple and dark yukatas. Women prefer eye-catching and bright ones.

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